Healthy Spaces & Places Healthy Spaces & Places

Resources and Links

Below are resources and links to Australian and international organisations working in the areas of health and planning. Also click here for further health and planning research.

International

  • Active Living by Design (US)
    Creates community-led change by working with local and national partners to build a culture of active living and healthy eating.
  • Active Living Research
    A national program contributing to the prevention of childhood obesity in low-income and high-risk racial/ethnic communities by supporting research to examine how environments and policies influence active living for children and their families.
  • American Planning Association (Planning and Designing the Physically Active Community)
    To encourage changes to the built environment that will promote physical activity as a means of improving the health of citizens.
  • Complete the Streets (US)
    To ensure that transportation planners and engineers consistently design and operate the entire roadway with all users in mind, regardless of age and ability.
  • Design for Play (UK)
    A guide primarily for commissioners and designers of children’s play areas incorporating principles and suggested approaches to inspire innovative and creative ideas.
  • Healthy Kids Healthy Communities (US)
    Helping communities reshape their environments to support healthy living and prevent childhood obesity.
  • International Physical Activity and the Environment Network
    The Network aims to, among other things, increase communication and collaboration between researchers investigating environmental correlates of physical activity.
  • Living Streets
    Advocating vibrant streets to revitalise neighbourhoods and reconnect people.
  • London Healthy Urban Development Unit
    Recognises that there is an increasing awareness of the role that spatial planning plays in supporting and promoting healthier communities, but that it is still not being exploited in practice.
  • Oxford Health Alliance
    Drawing awareness to preventing and reducing the global impact of chronic disease, including those stemming from physical inactivity and poor diet.
  • Share the Road (NZ)
    How to run campaigns related to speed, driveway safety, giving way and cycle courtesy.
  • Smart Growth (US)
    Working to support citizen-driven planning that coordinates development, transportation, revitalisation of older areas and preservation of open space and the environment
  • The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (US)
    An independent philanthropy devoted to improving health policy and practice in order to help people lead healthier lives.
  • Unfit for Purpose (Institute for European Environmental Policy)
    A report that highlights the extent to which car use is implicated in the increase in obesity as well as rising carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions.
  • Walk 21
    Championing the development of healthy, sustainable and efficient communities where people choose to walk.
  • Walk Score (US)
    Measures the walkability of any address, Australia included.
  • Watch out for health (UK)
    A checklist for assessing the health impact of planning proposals produced by the National Health Service London Healthy Urban Development Unit.
  • World Health Organisation (WHO) - Health Impact Assessment (UN)
    Provides decision-makers with information about how any policy, programme or project may affect the health of people.
  • WHO - Social Determinants of Health (UN)
    A report that responds to the increasing concern about persisting and widening inequities in health status and provides advice on how to reduce them.
  • WHO - Healthy Cities (UN)
    Strives to, among other things, include health considerations in economic, regeneration and urban development efforts.
  • WHO - Physical Activity (UN)
    Outlines benefits of physical activity

Australian Government

States & Territories

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NT

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SA

TAS

VIC

WA

Local Government

Non-Government

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Last updated on 10th February, 2016

Sponsors This project was funded by the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing.